Ladybird Fact Sheet

Infestation Identification: Ladybirds are usually red, orange or yellow with small black spots or black markings on their wing cases, they also have black and white patterned thorax and are an oval shape which are between 5mm to 8mm long. There are 3 main body parts; head, thorax and abdomen, their compound eyes allow them to see in different directions at once. They have 2 antennae on their heads and 6 legs.  

 

Common Names: 

Coccinelliadae (Ladybird)

Coccinella Septempunctata (Seven-Spot Ladybird)

 

Diet: Aphids are the preferred food source for ladybirds, however where aphids are scarce, they will feed on pollen or come cannibalistic.  They also feed on other insects such as mites and insect eggs.

 

Habitat: Ladybirds become active in March and will be found in foliage, when the weather gets warmer, they will be found in all areas; such as gardens, hedgerows, farms, parks and woodlands, especially where there is an abundance of aphids. Adults will hibernate in cracks and crevices, shed, garages, hollow plant stems and other similar places.

 

Prevention: There is no way to prevent ladybirds and they do not cause any harm to properties, in fact, they are ideal to have in your garden because they feed on aphids and other insects which will kill your plants.

 

Life Cycle: Adult Ladybirds become active between March and October. During May and June, most adults will mate, the eggs will not be fertilised until spring. The female will lay her eggs in batches which contain approximately 10- to 20 eggs, in total she will lay between 250 and 500 eggs. Eggs will be laid in foliage where there is an abundance of aphids, the larvae will hatch in 2 to 10 days and will feed on their membrane before feeding on aphids. The larvae will then stick to the underside of a leaf to begin its pupation stage, which takes place 10 to 21 days later, depending on weather and food sources, they will then emerge as adults. Their life expectancy is from 12 to 24 months.

 

General Information: Ladybirds are part of the beetle family and are useful insects in the agricultural industry because they usually feed on aphids and scale insects. After each stage of their growth, ladybirds will shed their skins. Ladybirds can play dead when they feel threatened and when they are handled they release a yellow, pungent substance from their joints (known as controlled bleeding) that can stain hands.

 

Treatments: Treatments for ladybirds are not usually required, however some people find them concerning and do wish to have treatments carried out. There are insecticides which can be purchased from shops, however these often are not strong enough or they do not have residual properties. We recommend a fumigation is carried out, there is no preparation required, although if chemicals are opted for, the property will require to be vacated for a minimum of 4 to 5 hours prior to the treatment and rooms require ventilating for an hour upon returning to the property. We also offer organic pest control treatments which are just as successful as using chemicals.

 

Quick Facts:

  • Ladybirds are not classified as true bugs.

  • The most common species in the UK is the Seven Spot Ladybird.

  • A single larva can eat up to 75 aphids in a single day.

  • Ladybirds live for 1 to 2 years.

  • After each growth stage, the larvae will shed their old skin.

  • when handled, they release a yellow, pungent substance from their joints (known as controlled bleeding) that can stain the hands.

  • Adult Ladybirds become active between March and October

  • A female will lay between 250 and 500 eggs.

  • Ladybirds can play dead when they feel threatened.

  • They are ideal to have in your garden because they feed on aphids and other insects which will kill your plants.

SERVICE

PEST CONTROL

 

FREEPHONE: 0800 8247 167
  • Service Pest Control on Twitter
  • Service Pest Control on LinkedIn
  • Service Pest Control on Facebook

© 2019 SERVICE PEST CONTROL All rights reserved.